Should you hire or contract your marketing department

Posted on Aug 13, 2015 in Infographic | 0 comments

Should you hire or contract your marketing department

Determining the right marketing needs for your organization requires a balance of different considerations: size, cost, skills, and tacit industry knowledge. This is why it is often a difficult decision for marketing execs to find the precise solution for their department. To discover whether it’s better to hire a full-time, in-house marketing team or to contract those tasks out to another firm, follow the chart...

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The evolution of PR in the era of social media

Posted on Jul 31, 2015 in Infographic | 0 comments

The evolution of PR in the era of social media

Social media has evolved many areas of marketing and Public Relations (PR) is obviously one of them. PR used to be close to the board and less connected to the marketing team. Nowadays they are frontrunners when it comes to using social media and connecting with the customers. Topics can no longer be avoided or discussed exclusively in planned press-conferences or carefully dictated press releases. Your brand is discussed everywhere and if not address properly, out of your control. The below infographic from inkhouse provides a clear overview on how PR has...

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Gamification: it can be the motivating spark

Posted on Jul 28, 2015 in Video | 0 comments

Gamification: it can be the motivating spark

Gamification has become popular tactic across many domains: marketing, operations, education. In these fields, tools like scores and leader boards are used to motivate behaviors. The challenge with this is that these tools, which are the heart of gamification, are only a portion of what sparks our motivation in games. Score is only one of three motivators, the other two being social and story. My talk will emphasize that all three factors are important in the motivation of behavior. I introduce the three factors, how they motivate us and how they can be used in steering behavior. Joe Houde is an expert on human learning. He helps organizations create environments where their people can learn more effectively through experience. Over the past 20 years, eh has developed and taught action learning, computer simulations, game-based learning and Analogically Situated Experiences for companies in 12 different countries. His clients include companies in the telecommunications, pharmaceuticals, professional services, consulting, logistics and medical fields. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at...

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Utilising the real power of the #hashtag

Posted on Jul 24, 2015 in Infographic | 0 comments

Utilising the real power of the #hashtag

It has almost become part of our daily life and you see it everywhere, from social media to t-shirts, the #hashtag. Not only does it serve the purpose of organising topics and linking messages, it helps brand recognition, improves you reach and allows you to engage with your customers. Its an old infographic published via the huffington post, but not less relevant. It gives a solid explanation on what the #hashtag is and how it can be used. Perhaps it may inspire you to revisit how you use your...

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The customer gap, premium puzzle and future of marketing

Posted on Jul 20, 2015 in Slideshare | 0 comments

The customer gap, premium puzzle and future of marketing

Marketing is moving from a market creation tool to a customer interface tool. This means: * Taking ownership of the customer in the company and implementing this knowledge throughout * Creating and capturing new customer value * Surprising and delighting the customer * Finding new revenue streams and business models based on the customer interface In his presentation, Helge Tennø explanes how technology changes their customers and in turn their business. The Customer Gap, Premium Puzzle And Future Of Customer Interactions from Helge...

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The different types of marketing explained

Posted on Jul 17, 2015 in Infographic | 0 comments

The different types of marketing explained

In todays marketing there are many buzz words and acronyms that its sometimes difficult to grasp the essence of marketing. Not to worry, no matter how you call it, marketing is still all about positively promoting your product, brand or organisation towards an audience. But within marketing there are different methodologies for achieving...

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Agile Marketing Meetup – Jascha Kaykas-Wolff

Posted on Jul 15, 2015 in Video | 0 comments

Jascha Kaykas-Wolff, CMO of BitTorrent, drops hard learned practical knowledge for Agile Marketers to bring back to their company or startup.

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The essential need for database cleanup and management

Posted on Jul 14, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

The essential need for database cleanup and management

A good marketing plan needs good data. It is not enough if you collect it and use it once. Data can be used well, again and again, if it is maintained and kept clean with regular cleansing processes. It saves a ton of money, gives you the opportunity to work on the same data and also gives you better returns. The reason we say this is that data decays at the rate of 20% per month, a big number, considering the ROI aspect of marketing. To stop this, you need good database cleansing and maintenance processes. The finer aspects of database management is provided to you by email data group in a free...

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What it takes to tackle marketing accountability

Posted on Jul 13, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

What it takes to tackle marketing accountability

Have you ever had one of those piles on your desk that you keep moving from one corner to another? You know that you need to get to it, but avoid it because it will take some real effort to tackle. For many marketing professionals, marketing accountability, analytics and ROI are in that pile. Not too long ago at a marketing conference where Laura was speaking, the organizers had set up breakfast table discussions. Laura was sitting at the Measuring Marketing ROI table, which was strategically located right next to the buffet line. While she was sitting there she kept hearing people say, “Oh, measuring marketing, that’s just too hard.” There were hundreds of marketers attending this conference. Yet only four brave souls joined her. We must stop avoiding this topic and tackle the pile. As Sylvia Reynolds the CMO of Wells Fargo says, “Marketing must be a driver of tangible business results…we must start with the goal in mind and a clear way to measure that goal.” ROI is important for accountability. It enables us to justify spending and run the marketing organization more effectively and efficiently, and knowing what is and isn’t working helps us achieve greater influence and serve in a more strategic role. Various surveys suggest that 33-42% of marketing budgets are insufficient to achieve the expected outcomes and impact. Perhaps your organization like many others is in the midst of budget planning. A key part of the process is to establish and validate the money you plan to spend. The more aligned marketing is with the outcomes of the organization, and the extent to which the plan includes performance targets and metrics, the more likely you will be allocated the budget you need to achieve the expected results. So what does it take to tackle this Marketing Accountability pile? Here are six affordable steps any marketing organization can take to get started. Be Focused. Nothing that is relevant gets done on its own. To effectively tackle marketing measurement will take all of Covey’s seven habits: from taking a proactive approach and beginning with the end in mind (the outcomes you are expected to impact), to keeping the effort a priority when other things present themselves as urgencies, to making marketing measurement a win/win for you, your team, and the rest of the organization. More than likely, you are going to need a cross-functional team to achieve this goal – people from finance, sales, IT, operations, etc. working collaboratively together to define the metrics and hunt down and organize the data. Plan an attack. You know that age-old question, “How do you eat an elephant?” The answer being, “One bite at a time.” This is true for the marketing accountability and ROI question. If this is a new effort for you, you need to break it into manageable pieces. Quantify your objectives, decide how you will measure them, collect the data that you need to meet the objectives, establish a baseline, gain commitment to the measurement plan, and finally, measure results. Collect data. “Data is the new creative,” declares Stephan Chase of Marriott Rewards. Establishing metrics, determining effectiveness, understanding efficiencies, all take data. Without data you cannot monitor and measure results. And don’t assume that you have the data needed to measure your objectives. For example, if you want to measure how many new customers you interest in a new product, you may find that you need first to determine what constitutes a “new” customer. This may require...

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Use the customer buying process to align sales and marketing and accelerate revenue

Posted on Jul 11, 2015 in Blog | 0 comments

Use the customer buying process to align sales and marketing and accelerate revenue

The most critical link to customers is the alignment between sales and marketing. Having well-oiled sales and marketing functions that work well together and that are both aligned with the customer buying cycle can make all the difference in successfully addressing revenue and growth efforts. In fact, research firm IDC calls marketing and sales alignment one of the greatest opportunities to improve the revenue cycle. Aligning Sales and Marketing in Four Key Areas There’s plenty of talk about aligning Sales and Marketing, and most often that conversation is around lead management. But Sales and Marketing need to be aligned in at least these four areas: Market and customer segmentation Go-to-market strategy, process, and planning Sales enablement Opportunity management That fourth area, opportunity management, is one of the first places any organisation can address to see relatively fast improvements and value. What is opportunity management? It’s the complete process of tracking and managing new revenue opportunities (prospective and current customer business)—from the generation of the opportunity to its conversion into a customer relationship. When well defined and properly implemented, the opportunity-management process provides insight into both the effectiveness and the efficiency of your marketing and sales efforts. Six Opportunity-Management Best-Practices Today’s business environment has brought the topic of opportunity management to the forefront. Organisations cannot afford opportunities to go unpursued, nor can they afford to expend energy, time, and money pursuing opportunities that will not convert to business. The following six best practices can help you increase the effectiveness of your opportunity-management process: Use the customer-buying process as the foundation for aligning both organisations. Track and score leads based on prospect behaviour. Collaborate on defining what constitutes a qualified lead and to determine when an opportunity is sales-ready. Measure marketing’s impact on the sales pipeline and the number of open opportunities that result from marketing programs. Use customer behaviour to map the most-appropriate subsequent interactions. Leverage opportunity-nurturing programs. The first best-practice, using the customer-buying process as the foundation for aligning both organisations, is the very first step any organisation can take to improve its marketing and sales alignment. Doing so has implications for the remaining best practices as well as for the configuration of your marketing-automation, sales-automation, and campaign-management systems.  A Customer-Oriented Opportunity-Management Pipeline The notion of a sales pipeline (that is, the flow of business opportunities), is very familiar to most organisations. But developing that pipeline around the customer-buying process may be new territory. The following two lists show the differences between a sales-oriented pipeline and a customer buying-oriented pipeline. Scenario A: Pipeline Elements Scenario B: Pipeline Elements ·      Identify the buyer ·      Visit website. ·      Send an email. ·      Download a document. ·      Call to meet. ·      Request a call. ·      Schedule a Meeting. ·      Describe a project. ·      Assess the need. ·      Attend a webinar. ·      Determine the budget. ·      Schedule a meeting. ·      Submit a quote. ·      Provide Specifications and Budget.             ·      Deliver a presentation ·      Participate in a Demo. ·      Submit a proposal. ·      Request a Proposal. Did you catch the nuances between the two scenarios? If you thought Scenario B described customer behaviour and Scenario A described company behaviour, you are right on target. Here are seven steps you can use to create a customer-buying pipeline: Define the...

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